Dr. Erin Gustafson

Dr. Erin Gustafson was born and raised in northeast Texas, relocating to Lubbock to complete her undergraduate degree in Zoology at Texas Tech University.

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Dentist - Humble
9630 North Sam Houston Pkwy E. Bldg B
Humble, TX 77396
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Posts for: December, 2021

Resolvedfor2022HealthierTeethandGumsandaMoreAttractiveSmile

That rumble you hear is 2022 about to roar into your life on New Year's Eve—so, you better get hopping on those resolutions! And rather than go with the old standbys—exercising more, losing weight or taking up a new hobby—consider trying, à la Monty Python, "something completely different": doing something special for your teeth and gums.

Actually, we're talking about two goals in one: improving your overall oral health and enhancing your smile. Here's how you can make 2022 your year for a healthier and more attractive smile.

Daily oral hygiene. One of the biggest hindrances to your smile's health and appearance is dental plaque. This thin bacterial film that accumulates on tooth surfaces is the number one trigger for tooth decay and gum disease. Its crusty appearance also dulls your teeth and robs them of their natural shine. Resolve, then, to brush and floss every day to remove dental plaque and brighten your smile.

Regular dental visits. There are a number of benefits for twice-a-year dental visits. For one, a professional dental cleaning removes any plaque and tartar (hardened plaque) you might have missed with daily cleaning—and your hygienist may complete the session with polishing paste to ramp up your teeth's shine. It's also a chance for your dentist to examine your teeth and gums for signs of disease.

Veneers or crowns. It's common for even healthy teeth to have some unattractive flaws. Veneers, custom-made shells of porcelain bonded to the face of visible teeth, can mask those imperfections. For more serious defects, we may recommend a full porcelain crown that not only protects a vulnerable tooth, but can certainly improve its looks.

Dental restorations. There are several ways to replace a missing tooth and restore both its function and appearance. Currently, the gold standard for dental restorations is the dental implant, which can be used to replace individual teeth or support dentures or bridges. Implants can also improve the long-term health of supporting bone.

Orthodontics. Crooked teeth aren't just unappealing—they're also harder to keep clean, and thus keep healthy. But we can straighten them with braces or clear aligner treatments to boost both your oral health and your smile. And, you can undergo orthodontics even if you're well past adolescence—as long as you and your mouth are reasonably healthy, you can have your teeth straightened at any age.

If you've resolved this year to improve your smile health and appearance, then don't delay. See us beginning in the new year to get started on a treatment plan. By the time you're ringing in 2023, you can have a healthier mouth and a more amazing smile.

If you would like more information about transforming your oral health and smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Third Set of Teeth.”


BuffaloBillsStefonDiggsKnowsTheresNeveraBadPlacetoFloss

Buffalo Bills wide receiver Stefon Diggs wrapped up the NFL regular season in January, setting single-season records in both catches and receiving yards. The Bills handily beat the Miami Dolphins, earning themselves the second seed in the AFC playoffs, and Diggs certainly did his part, making 7 catches for 76 yards. But what set the internet ablaze was not Diggs' accomplishments on the field but rather what the camera caught him doing on the sidelines—flossing his teeth!

The Twitterverse erupted with Bills fans poking fun at Diggs. But Diggs is not ashamed of his good oral hygiene habits, and CBS play-by-play announcer Kevin Harlan expressed his support with “Dental hygiene is something to take note of, kids! There's never a bad place to floss” and “When you lead the NFL in catches and yards, you can floss anytime you want.”

We like to think so. There's an old joke among dentists:
Q. Which teeth do you need to floss?
A. Only the ones you want to keep.

Although this sounds humorous, it is borne out in research. Of note, a 2017 study showed that people who floss have a lower risk of tooth loss over periods of 5 years and 10 years, and a 2020 study found that older adults who flossed lost an average of 1 tooth in 5 years, while those who don't lost around 4 teeth in the same time period.

We in the dental profession stress the importance of flossing as a daily habit—and Stefon Diggs would likely agree—yet fewer than 1 in 3 Americans floss every day. The 2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), conducted by the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, revealed that only 30% of Americans floss every day, while 37% floss less than every day and 32% never floss.

The biggest enemy on the football field may be the opposing team, but the biggest enemy to your oral health is plaque, a sticky film of bacteria and food debris that builds up on tooth surfaces. Plaque can cause tooth decay and gum disease, the number one cause of tooth loss among adults. Flossing is necessary to remove plaque from between teeth and around the gums where a toothbrush can't reach. If not removed, plaque hardens into tartar, which can only be removed by the specialized tools used in the dental office. Regular professional dental cleanings are also needed to get at those hard-to-reach spots you may have missed.

If Diggs can find time to floss during a major NFL game, the rest of us can certainly find a couple minutes a day to do it. While we might not recommend Diggs' technique of flossing from one side of the mouth to the other, we commend his enthusiasm and commitment to keeping his teeth and gums healthy. Along with good dental hygiene at home—or on the sidelines if you are Stefon Diggs—regular professional dental cleanings and checkups play a key role in maintaining a healthy smile for life.

If you would like more information about keeping in the best dental health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”


By Gustafson Dental
December 02, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
RecurringSinusInfectionsCouldBeaSignofToothDecay

It seems like every year you make at least one trip to the doctor for a sinus infection. You might blame it on allergies or a "bug" floating around, but it could be caused by something else: tooth decay.

We're referring to an advanced form of tooth decay, which has worked its way deep into the pulp and root canals of a tooth. And, it could have an impact on your sinuses if the tooth in question is a premolar or molar in the back of the upper jaw.

These particular teeth are located just under the maxillary sinus, a large, open space behind your cheek bones. In some people, these teeth's roots can extend quite close to the sinus floor, or may even extend through it.

It's thus possible for an infection in such a tooth to spread from the tip of the roots into the maxillary sinus. Unbeknownst to you, the infection could fester within the tooth for years, occasionally touching off a sinus infection.

Treating with antibiotics may relieve the sinus infection, but it won't reach the bacteria churning away inside the tooth, the ultimate cause for the infection. Until you address the decay within the tooth, you could keep getting the occasional sinus infection.

Fortunately, we can usually treat this interior tooth decay with a tried and true method called root canal therapy. Known simply as a "root canal," this procedure involves drilling a hole into the tooth to access the infected tissue in the pulp and root canals. After removing the diseased tissue and disinfecting the empty spaces, we fill the pulp and root canals and then seal and crown the tooth to prevent future infection.

Because sinus infections could be a sign of a decayed tooth, it's not a bad idea to see a dentist or endodontist (root canal specialist) if you're having them frequently. Treating it can restore the tooth to health—and maybe put a stop to those recurring sinus infections.

If you would like more information on the connection between tooth decay and sinus problems, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sinusitis and Tooth Infections.”




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(281) 359-9900